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INFLUENCE OF LOAD ON EXPRESSIONS OF UPPER BODY POWER DURING MEDICINE BALL THROWS

By: Ava Kerr

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The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of load on expressions of upper body power collected from a medicine ball push-press (MBP-P). Ten recreationally trained university students volunteered to participate in this study (8 male and 2 female). Participants performed series of explosive MBP-P throws using a 2kg, 3kg, 4kg, and 5kg medicine ball whilst lying supine on a steel platform positioned over a force platform (1000 Hz). All MBP-P throws were initiated with the medicine ball held against the sternum with the arms adducted and the order of loads were randomised between participants. A bench press 5RM was also obtained for each subject to test the influence of relative strength on upper body high-speed power. Maximal dynamic strength (MDS), impulse at MDS, time to MDS, maximum rate of force development (RFDmax), maximum ball velocity (MaxBV), and maximum ball acceleration (MaxBA) were calculated from vertical force data collected from the force platform outputs. A series of one-way ANOVA statistical tests were used to test for the influence of medicine ball load on the various power variables. MaxBV and MaxBA were both significantly faster at 2kg than at 5kg, with none of the other medicine ball kinematic or dynamic strength variables differing significantly at each of the MBP-P throw loads. Correlation analyses found medium to very strong relationships between 5RM bench press strength and MDS and the ball kinematic and strength quality variables across all medicine ball sizes (r = 0.65-0.95). The exception was time to MDS, which had almost no relationship either variable. These findings are useful for an athletic population that require high velocity, light load upper body pushing power.



Journal - For more research on fitness: http://fitnessresearch.edu.au/journal